Welcome to Methodist Homes for the Aged (Eastern Cape)

Methodist Homes for the Aged (Eastern Cape)---MHA---is engaged in the business of providing affordable, secure, comfortable accommodation as well as caring, professional frail care facilities to qualifying retired persons and, as far as we are able to, providing products and services for all phases of their ageing process.  We endeavour to create and maintain a loving and supportive community-focused environment, subscribing to Christian values.


MEET THE MHA MANAGEMENT TEAM

11 June 2018

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The team, which gathered for a meeting on 8 June 2018, paused for a photo opportunity.

Seen in the photo are:

Back: Gavin Parker (Annesley Gardens/Sheariton), George Bezuidenhout (Maintenance Manager), Jannie Bosch (Aldersgate), Susan Bosch (Aldersgate), Jacques McLeod (Maintenance), Nelmari Windell (Maranatha Frail Care), Sanet Marx (Nursing Services Manager/CP Bradfield) 

Front: Gillian le Roux (Professional Nurse/Counsellor), Noluthando Khunjuzwa (Head Office), Henry Thysse (Maranatha Village), Sandra Cornwell (Head Office), Jenny van Niekerk (Cassia Gardens), Lynné Smitsdorff (Wesley Gardens), Fred Marshall (Irvine Villa)

Absent: Hein Barnard (taking the photo!), Bukelwa Gongxeka (Head Office), Roslyn Rose (Bob Zeiss Bedsitters) and Charmaine Swart (Epworth Close)

 MHA, and the residents, are blessed to have such a wonderful, talented and caring team!


SAVE OUR PLANET: RECYCLING IS CRITICAL!!

11 Jun 2018

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 Every year, 20 million tons of garbage is added to our oceans, 80% of it from mainland waste. That’s like dumping over 710,000 Boeing 737 airplanes into the ocean…..each year! Within a South African context, we generated approximately 108 million tons of waste in 2011 (the latest available figures), of which 98 million tons was disposed of at landfill sites. In the order of 59 million

tons was general waste, 48 million tons was currently unclassified waste, and the remaining 1 million tons hazardous waste. Approximately 10% of all waste generated in South Africa was recycled in 2011. In the past 7 years these 2011 figures will have grown exponentially.

 The war on waste is picking up momentum globally, but there is still a huge amount of work to be done (education, discipline, penalties), if we are to avoid an ecological tragedy. Scientists predict that by 2050 there will be more plastic than fish in our oceans. When will the world’s population start taking this seriously? Is anyone really paying attention?

 For many years now, MHA’s Aldersgate village in Greenshields Park has been taking waste management and recycling seriously. According to John Wilmot (pictured), an Aldersgate resident who drives their recycling initiative: “Last year we avoided 6.4 tons of landfill, by recycling roughly 2.8 tons of paper and 2.1 tons of glass bottles. The primary function of the  project at Aldersgate is recycling to avoid pollution, as the R723 which we received from commercial recyclers last year is handy for our village’s ‘social kitty’, but does not make economic sense labour-wise”.

 MHA applauds the efforts of John and his fellow residents, as well as those in other MHA villages who take recycling seriously. Every bit helps the planet, helps manage our local landfill sites, helps with educating others about this vital habit, and the R723 will help put a lot of free beers and snacks on the table at the next Aldersgate party!


"URBAN VILLAGES": THE FINAL CHAPTER

11 June 2018

In terms of its impact on the citizens of our Metro, during a past period of turmoil and change, the story of Urban Villages is a fascinating one, and is comprehensively recorded in the "Driving Change" chapter in MHA's history book. As a consequence of Urban Villages’ decision to wind up their business, our organization was richly blessed as being identified as the beneficiary of their assets. It has taken thirteen years to finally wind up the business (the reasons could fill this whole Newsletter, so you will be spared the detail!), but it has finally happened, and so we can now write the "final chapter" of this wonderful story of generosity and good fortune. The final value of the gift from Urban Villages to MHA is around R3.9 million--significant by any standards--and can be summarized as follows:

 Earlier developments

  •  A piece of land in Charlo, upon which Irvine Villa was built in 2011
  •  A small erf in Charlo, not suitable for our needs, was sold
  •  36 residential erven in Bethelsdorp were sold to a developer
  •  One large erf in Bethelsdorp was invaded by squatters, and MHA donated that land to a Community Trust, rather than attempt to reclaim it
  •  Two large erven in Sherwood, not suitable for development of another MHA village, were sold to a developer

The Final Chapter

  • A piece of land in KwaDwesi had a pre-school built on the site, without the knowledge of Urban Villages or MHA. Rather than reclaim the land (which would have led to the school being demolished), MHA decided to donate the land to the school, which is now registered as a NPO. This necessitated a long and costly legal process, paid for by MHA, but is now finalized
  • After all winding-up costs were paid, a considerable amount of cash formed the balance of the assets received.

 

Now that the final chapter has been reached, the MHA Board and Management team are in the process of deciding how best to use the funds received from Urban Villages. While this can be considered as work in progress, one thing is certain; the gifts received will be used in such a way that MHA will create a lasting legacy to acknowledge and salute the huge generosity bestowed upon our organization by those who were left to close Urban Villages.

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 Thabong Pre-school (exterior and interior)

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Celebrating the transfer of assets (L to R) Malcolm Stewart (MHA Director), Rod Philip (Urban Villages representative) and Hein Barnard (MHA General Manager)


CELEBRATING SOME OF OUR NONAGENARIANS!

29 May 2018

On 25 May 2018 a wonderful tea party was held in the Bob Zeiss Besditters lounge, to celebrate life with many of our nonagenarians from CP Bradfield frail care, the Bedsitters and adjacent Cassia Gardens. A string quartet from Alexander Road High School entertained with beautiful sounds, after which everyone present tucked into scrumptious snacks (generously provided by our friends at Sunridge Superspar) and tea.

To qualify for “nonagenarian” status one has to have lived for at least 32850 days----what a long life, and what an achievement. MHA is blessed to have so many nonagenarians in our midst (and there are many more, in our other villages!).

Cassia Gardens

Our nonagenarians from Cassia Gardens

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Our nonagenarians from CP Bradfield Frail Care

Bob Zeis









Our nonagenarians from Bob Zeiss Bedsitters




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A PROUD "OLD GREY" MAN!!

11 May 2018

Neil Frames, a former resident at Maranatha Village and now a resident at CP Bradfield Frail Care, was spotted on Wednesday 9 May waiting to be picked up by an old school friend, to go to one of their 70th anniversary Old Grey Reunion functions.

Neil matriculated at Grey in 1948, and he is proud to be old, grey and an "Old Grey”! Among Neil's any creative talents are his musical and artistic skills; he loves playing the piano in the Bob Zeiss Bedsitter lounge, and some of his artworks adorn the walls of the community hall at Maranatha Village. The ever cheerful Neil adds brightness to everyone's day.





MHA CELEBRATES ANOTHER NONAGENARIAN!!

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5 May 2018

On  5 May 2018 Beulah Kruger of Aldersgate village celebrated her 90th birthday. Congratulations, Beulah! On her special day she had an "open house", for residents and friends to pop in to wish her happy birthday. Many residents had not seen her outstanding display of teaspoons, collected over many years, and each one has a special memory.

Two of Beulah's four daughters, Evelyn and Colleen, were able to be with her to celebrate her birthday.

(with thanks to John Wilmot/Aldersgate for the article and photograph)



THE “FLYING FOX” TAKES TO THE SKIES---YET AGAIN

The ‘Flying Fox of Aldersgate’ has taken to the skies again - and although very nervous he was happy to pay the ‘bill’ once his paws were firmly back on the ground.

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In yet another foxy move by Billy Wilson Fox, 80, a long-time resident of the village, he trotted off to Mossel Bay with his daughter Carla, this time to sky-dive while his daughter rode horses.

This was not Bill’s first flight of fancy. In recent years Bill has gone hot air ballooning (in Australia), zip-lined in the Tsitsikamma, taken a trip in a glider and more recently (in March last year) para-glided, in tandem, off a high hill near the Wilderness.

Seeking yet another exhilarating experience he nervously booked a sky dive for July but had to cancel it when he was grounded with a bad bout of flu. Upon recovery he rebooked for November but again was grounded at short notice when he had to undergo a four-way heart bypass. His doctor promised him he would have him back playing his favourite game, tennis, by February 2018.

Bill was not going to let an op stop him in his tracks and soon thereafter every morning and evening he was sighted trotting around Aldersgate, getting his exercise.

He rebooked for March, knowing that his daughter Carla would be arriving from Australia. Shortly after her arrival Bill, wife Pam and Carla drove to Mossel Bay and booked B&B on a horse farm.

After a thorough briefing from his instructor, ‘Mr G’, Bill took to the bright blue skies in a very small, light, high-winged single prop plane on a near perfect day to jump.

He said they were the only passengers in a rather cramped cockpit; in fact so cramped, he said, he had to sit strapped to his instructor, on his legs.

When the plane was two miles (about three kilometres) up he, as instructed, hung his legs out the open door. Bill admits ‘I was very nervous and the tension was running high’. Down far below he could see the distant land mass.

Then came the order to jump. Immediately they left the plane he found himself turned upside-down due to the severe turbulence, with a great G force distorting his cheeks. ‘We remained that way until the drone parachute was deployed to stabilize us. I will admit that was one of the scariest moments of my life’.

Bill said they free-fell for about half the distance, reaching a speed, according to his instructor, of 220km per hour. Once the main chute deployed they began to drift gently to the ground, all the while, in the silence of the moment, surveying the 360° view while Mr G occasionally pointed out a few local features.

Coming in to land at ‘quite a pace’, he followed the instruction to pull hard on his leg straps to rise. They hit the ground softer than he had imagined they would, and walked away unhurt but feeling hugely exhilarated.

In fact so exhilarated he now wants to try a sky-dive somewhere in the Drakensberg.

But the Flying Fox’s vixen Pam, greatly relieved once he was safely back on terra firma, now wants him to keep his paws firmly on the ground!

(article submitted by fellow resident Colin Urquhart)




                                        

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© Methodist Homes Port Elizabeth 2016, Photographic copyright © Colin Urquhart, Karl du Preez, FLIPmedia